Zooplankton community changes confound the biodilution theory of methylmercury accumulation in a recovering mercury-contaminated lake

Svetoslava Todorova, Charles T Driscoll, David A. Matthews, Steven W. Effler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study, the biodilution hypothesis of methylmercury (MeHg) accumulation was examined in a Hg-contaminated ecosystem that has undergone concurrent changes in nutrient loading and zooplankton community composition. Using a long-term record of 17 years (between 1980 and 2009), we demonstrate that zooplankton MeHg concentrations in Onondaga Lake, NY, are strongly driven by changes in the zooplankton community and body size. MeHg concentrations in zooplankton increased with an increase in body size and biomass. The highest concentrations of MeHg were observed under eutrophic and hypereutrophic conditions when large-bodied Daphnia species, Daphnia pulicaria and Daphnia galeata mendotae, were present. Bioconcentration rather than biodilution was governing the accumulation of MeHg in zooplankton without apparent growth dilution or zooplankton biomass dilution. Algal-bloom dilution controlled the variability in the MeHg concentration only under hypereutrophic conditions when Ceriodaphnia predominated the cladoceran population. Our study demonstrates that changes in zooplankton community composition confound the biodilution theory in Onondaga Lake and that the presence of large-bodied zooplankton species drives elevated MeHg concentrations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4066-4071
Number of pages6
JournalEnvironmental Science and Technology
Volume49
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 7 2015

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methylmercury
Mercury
Dilution
Lakes
zooplankton
lake
Biomass
Chemical analysis
Ecosystems
Nutrients
dilution
community composition
body size
mercury
biomass
bioaccumulation
algal bloom
nutrient
ecosystem

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry

Cite this

Zooplankton community changes confound the biodilution theory of methylmercury accumulation in a recovering mercury-contaminated lake. / Todorova, Svetoslava; Driscoll, Charles T; Matthews, David A.; Effler, Steven W.

In: Environmental Science and Technology, Vol. 49, No. 7, 07.04.2015, p. 4066-4071.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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