Young children's family history of stuttering and their articulation, language and attentional abilities

An exploratory study

Dahye Choi, Edward G. Conture, Victoria Tumanova, Chagit E. Clark, Tedra A. Walden, Robin M. Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine whether young children who do (CWS) and do not stutter (CWNS) with a positive versus negative family history of stuttering differ in articulation, language and attentional abilities and family histories of articulation, language and attention related disorders. Method Participants were 25 young CWS and 50 young CWNS. All 75 participants’ caregivers consistently reported a positive or negative family history of stuttering across three consecutive time points that were about 8 months apart for a total of approximately 16 months. Each participant's family history focused on the same, relatively limited number of generations (i.e., participants’ parents & siblings). Children's family history of stuttering as well as articulation, language, and attention related disorders was obtained from one or two caregivers during an extensive interview. Children's speech and language abilities were measured using four standardized articulation and language tests and their attentional abilities were measured using caregiver reports of temperament. Results Findings indicated that (1) most caregivers (81.5% or 75 out 92) were consistent in their reporting of positive or negative history of stuttering; (2) CWNS with a positive family history of stuttering, compared to those with a negative family history of stuttering, were more likely to have reported a positive family history of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and (3) CWNS with a positive family history of stuttering had lower language scores than those with a negative family history of stuttering. However, there were no such significant differences in family histories of ADHD and language scores for CWS with a positive versus negative family history of stuttering. In addition, although 24% of CWS versus 12% of CWNS's caregivers reported a positive family history of stuttering, inferential analyses indicated no significant differences between CWS and CWNS in relative proportions of family histories of stuttering. Conclusion Finding that a relatively high proportion (i.e., 81.5%) of caregivers consistently reported a positive or negative family history of stuttering across three consecutive time points should provide some degree of assurance to those who collect such caregiver reports. Based on such consistent caregiver reports, linguistic as well as attentional vulnerabilities appear associated with a positive family history of stuttering, a finding that must await further empirical study for confirmation or refutation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)22-36
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Communication Disorders
Volume71
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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Stuttering
Aptitude
genealogy
Language
ability
language
Caregivers
caregiver
ADHD
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
history of language
Language Tests
Child Language
Temperament
Linguistics

Keywords

  • ADHD
  • Articulation
  • Attention
  • Family history
  • Language
  • Stuttering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Speech and Hearing
  • LPN and LVN

Cite this

Young children's family history of stuttering and their articulation, language and attentional abilities : An exploratory study. / Choi, Dahye; Conture, Edward G.; Tumanova, Victoria; Clark, Chagit E.; Walden, Tedra A.; Jones, Robin M.

In: Journal of Communication Disorders, Vol. 71, 01.01.2018, p. 22-36.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Choi, Dahye ; Conture, Edward G. ; Tumanova, Victoria ; Clark, Chagit E. ; Walden, Tedra A. ; Jones, Robin M. / Young children's family history of stuttering and their articulation, language and attentional abilities : An exploratory study. In: Journal of Communication Disorders. 2018 ; Vol. 71. pp. 22-36.
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abstract = "Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine whether young children who do (CWS) and do not stutter (CWNS) with a positive versus negative family history of stuttering differ in articulation, language and attentional abilities and family histories of articulation, language and attention related disorders. Method Participants were 25 young CWS and 50 young CWNS. All 75 participants’ caregivers consistently reported a positive or negative family history of stuttering across three consecutive time points that were about 8 months apart for a total of approximately 16 months. Each participant's family history focused on the same, relatively limited number of generations (i.e., participants’ parents & siblings). Children's family history of stuttering as well as articulation, language, and attention related disorders was obtained from one or two caregivers during an extensive interview. Children's speech and language abilities were measured using four standardized articulation and language tests and their attentional abilities were measured using caregiver reports of temperament. Results Findings indicated that (1) most caregivers (81.5{\%} or 75 out 92) were consistent in their reporting of positive or negative history of stuttering; (2) CWNS with a positive family history of stuttering, compared to those with a negative family history of stuttering, were more likely to have reported a positive family history of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and (3) CWNS with a positive family history of stuttering had lower language scores than those with a negative family history of stuttering. However, there were no such significant differences in family histories of ADHD and language scores for CWS with a positive versus negative family history of stuttering. In addition, although 24{\%} of CWS versus 12{\%} of CWNS's caregivers reported a positive family history of stuttering, inferential analyses indicated no significant differences between CWS and CWNS in relative proportions of family histories of stuttering. Conclusion Finding that a relatively high proportion (i.e., 81.5{\%}) of caregivers consistently reported a positive or negative family history of stuttering across three consecutive time points should provide some degree of assurance to those who collect such caregiver reports. Based on such consistent caregiver reports, linguistic as well as attentional vulnerabilities appear associated with a positive family history of stuttering, a finding that must await further empirical study for confirmation or refutation.",
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AU - Walden, Tedra A.

AU - Jones, Robin M.

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N2 - Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine whether young children who do (CWS) and do not stutter (CWNS) with a positive versus negative family history of stuttering differ in articulation, language and attentional abilities and family histories of articulation, language and attention related disorders. Method Participants were 25 young CWS and 50 young CWNS. All 75 participants’ caregivers consistently reported a positive or negative family history of stuttering across three consecutive time points that were about 8 months apart for a total of approximately 16 months. Each participant's family history focused on the same, relatively limited number of generations (i.e., participants’ parents & siblings). Children's family history of stuttering as well as articulation, language, and attention related disorders was obtained from one or two caregivers during an extensive interview. Children's speech and language abilities were measured using four standardized articulation and language tests and their attentional abilities were measured using caregiver reports of temperament. Results Findings indicated that (1) most caregivers (81.5% or 75 out 92) were consistent in their reporting of positive or negative history of stuttering; (2) CWNS with a positive family history of stuttering, compared to those with a negative family history of stuttering, were more likely to have reported a positive family history of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and (3) CWNS with a positive family history of stuttering had lower language scores than those with a negative family history of stuttering. However, there were no such significant differences in family histories of ADHD and language scores for CWS with a positive versus negative family history of stuttering. In addition, although 24% of CWS versus 12% of CWNS's caregivers reported a positive family history of stuttering, inferential analyses indicated no significant differences between CWS and CWNS in relative proportions of family histories of stuttering. Conclusion Finding that a relatively high proportion (i.e., 81.5%) of caregivers consistently reported a positive or negative family history of stuttering across three consecutive time points should provide some degree of assurance to those who collect such caregiver reports. Based on such consistent caregiver reports, linguistic as well as attentional vulnerabilities appear associated with a positive family history of stuttering, a finding that must await further empirical study for confirmation or refutation.

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