Wrapping liquids, solids, and gases in thin sheets

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many objects in nature and industry are wrapped in a thin sheet to enhance their chemical, mechanical, or optical properties. Similarly, there are a variety of methods for wrapping, from pressing a film onto a hard substrate to inflating a closed membrane, to spontaneously wrapping droplets using capillary forces. Each of these settings raises challenging nonlinear problems involving the geometry and mechanics of a thin sheet, often in the context of resolving a geometric incompatibility between two surfaces. Here, we review recent progress in this area, focusing on highly bendable films that are nonetheless hard to stretch, a class of materials that includes polymer films, metal foils, textiles, and graphene, as well as some biological materials. Significant attention is paid to two recent advances: a novel isometry that arises in the doubly-asymptotic limit of high flexibility and weak tensile forcing, and a simple geometric model for predicting the overall shape of an interfacial film while ignoring small-scale wrinkles, crumples, and folds.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)431-450
Number of pages20
JournalAnnual Review of Condensed Matter Physics
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 10 2019

Fingerprint

Gases
Liquids
liquids
gases
Graphite
inflating
Polymer films
metal foils
Biological materials
Graphene
Metal foil
incompatibility
textiles
Textiles
Mechanics
pressing
Optical properties
chemical properties
Membranes
Mechanical properties

Keywords

  • Buckling
  • Elastic sheets
  • Geometric incompatibility
  • Inflated surfaces
  • Isometries
  • Wrinkling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Wrapping liquids, solids, and gases in thin sheets. / Paulsen, Joseph.

In: Annual Review of Condensed Matter Physics, Vol. 10, No. 1, 10.03.2019, p. 431-450.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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