Workplace accommodations for people with disabilities: National Health Interview Survey Disability Supplement, 1994-1995

Craig Zwerling, Paul S. Whitten, Nancy L. Sprince, Charles S. Davis, Robert B. Wallace, Peter Blanck, Steven G. Heeringa

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

45 Scopus citations

Abstract

As American workers age, workers with impairments and functional limitations make up a larger percentage of our workforce. This investigation presents data from the National Health Interview Survey Disability Supplement 1994-1995 (NHIS-D) describing the nature of workplace accommodations in the American workforce and factors associated with the provision of such accommodations. Of a nationally representative sample of workers aged 18 to 69 years with a wide range of impairments, 12% reported receiving workplace accommodations. Males (odds ratio (OR) 0.64: 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.53-0.78) and Southerners (OR 0.57; 95% CI = 0.47-0.70) were less likely than others to receive workplace accommodations. Those with mental health conditions were less likely than others to receive accommodations (OR 0.56; 95% CI = 0.44-0.70). College graduates (OR 1.53; 95% CI = 1.22-1.91), older workers, full time workers (OR 3.99; 95% CI = 2.63-3.87), and the self-employed (OR 1.76; 95% CI = 1.28-2.41) were more likely than others to receive accommodations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)517-525
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume45
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2003

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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