Willie Gertrude Brown and the Unsettling of Black Settlements: Lessons for Community-Engaged Practice and Social Work Education

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Social work values require its educators to teach a history that represents diversity and inclusion, yet its history routinely omits the contributions of pioneering social workers of color. This omission promotes White hegemony as characterized by the emphasis on White reformers in the American settlement movement and the exclusion of Black social workers and activists. Using critical race theory, this article posits the need to dismantle White hegemony by examining the American settlement movement and the parallel settlement movement as a counter response by Black social workers, specifically, an unrecognized Black social worker of the 1930s, W. Gertrude Brown. This recognition portends the need for social work to critique its ahistorical perspective and perchance to rewrite its history.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)110-128
Number of pages19
JournalUrban Social Work
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2019

Keywords

  • ahistorism
  • Black settlement movement
  • community-engaged practice
  • critical race theory
  • W. Gertrude Brown

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Health(social science)

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