Who teaches mathematics content courses for prospective elementary teachers in the United States? Results of a national survey

Joanna O. Masingila, Dana E. Olanoff, Dennis K. Kwaka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article reports on a national survey of higher education institutions in the United States to answer the question, "Who teaches mathematics content courses for prospective elementary teachers, and what are these instructors' academic and teaching backgrounds?" We surveyed 1,926 institutions, and a faculty member from each of 825 institutions (42. 8 %) participated in the survey. The survey results demonstrate that the majority of institutions are not meeting the recommendations of the Conference Board of the Mathematical Sciences (The mathematical education of teachers. American Mathematical Society, Providence, RI, 2001), the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (Professional standards for teaching mathematics. National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, Reston, VA, 2005), and the National Council on Teacher Quality (Greenberg and Walsh 2008) for prospective elementary teachers to take at least nine credits of mathematics content designed specifically for them. Additionally, most instructors for these courses do not have elementary teaching experience and have likely not had opportunities to think deeply about the important ideas in elementary mathematics, and most institutions do not provide training and/or support for these instructors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)347-358
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Mathematics Teacher Education
Volume15
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2012

Keywords

  • Mathematics content courses
  • Mathematics teacher educators
  • Prospective elementary teachers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Mathematics(all)

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