Which way did they go? Newcomer movement through the Zooniverse

Corey Brian Jackson, Carsten Oesterlund, Veronica Maidel, Kevin G Crowston, Gabriel Mugar

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Research on newcomer roles in peer production sites (e.g., Wikipedia) is characterized by a broad and relatively wellarticulated set of functionally and culturally recognizable roles. But not all communities come with well-defined roles that newcomers can aspire to occupy. The present study explores activity clusters newcomers create when faced with few recognizable roles to fill and limited access to other participants' work that serves as an exemplar. Drawing on a mixed method research design, we present findings from an analysis of 1,687 newcomers' sessions in an online citizen science project. Our analysis revealed three major findings: (1) newcomers' activities exists across six session types; (2) newcomers toggle between light work sessions and more involved types of production or community engagement; (3) high-level contributors contribute large volumes of work but comment very little and another group contributes large volumes of comments, but works very little. The former group draws heavily on posts contributed by the latter group. Identifying shifts and regularities in contribution facilitate improved mechanisms for engaging participants and for the design of online citizen science communities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery
Pages624-635
Number of pages12
Volume27
ISBN (Print)9781450335928
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 27 2016
Event19th ACM Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing, CSCW 2016 - San Francisco, United States
Duration: Feb 27 2016Mar 2 2016

Other

Other19th ACM Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing, CSCW 2016
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco
Period2/27/163/2/16

Keywords

  • Citizen science
  • Crowdsourcing
  • Online communities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Human-Computer Interaction

Cite this

Jackson, C. B., Oesterlund, C., Maidel, V., Crowston, K. G., & Mugar, G. (2016). Which way did they go? Newcomer movement through the Zooniverse. In Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW (Vol. 27, pp. 624-635). Association for Computing Machinery. https://doi.org/10.1145/2818048.2835197

Which way did they go? Newcomer movement through the Zooniverse. / Jackson, Corey Brian; Oesterlund, Carsten; Maidel, Veronica; Crowston, Kevin G; Mugar, Gabriel.

Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW. Vol. 27 Association for Computing Machinery, 2016. p. 624-635.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Jackson, CB, Oesterlund, C, Maidel, V, Crowston, KG & Mugar, G 2016, Which way did they go? Newcomer movement through the Zooniverse. in Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW. vol. 27, Association for Computing Machinery, pp. 624-635, 19th ACM Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing, CSCW 2016, San Francisco, United States, 2/27/16. https://doi.org/10.1145/2818048.2835197
Jackson CB, Oesterlund C, Maidel V, Crowston KG, Mugar G. Which way did they go? Newcomer movement through the Zooniverse. In Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW. Vol. 27. Association for Computing Machinery. 2016. p. 624-635 https://doi.org/10.1145/2818048.2835197
Jackson, Corey Brian ; Oesterlund, Carsten ; Maidel, Veronica ; Crowston, Kevin G ; Mugar, Gabriel. / Which way did they go? Newcomer movement through the Zooniverse. Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW. Vol. 27 Association for Computing Machinery, 2016. pp. 624-635
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