Welfare Reform, Work-Family Tradeoffs, and Child Well-Being

Andrew S London, Ellen K. Scott, Kathryn Edin, Vicki Hunter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

71 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Welfare reform and related policy changes have altered the context in which welfare-reliant women make choices about employment and family care. Using data from longitudinal qualitative interviews, we examined women's experiences of work-family tradeoffs and how they think their employment affected their children. Women identified multiple co-occurring costs and benefits of work for themselves and their children. Benefits included: increased income; increased self-esteem, feelings of independence, and social integration; and the ability to model work and self-sufficiency values for children. Costs included: working without increased income; overload, exhaustion, and stress; and less time and energy to be with, supervise, and support children. The relevance of these findings for family policy specialists and practitioners who work with low-income families is discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)148-158
Number of pages11
JournalFamily Relations
Volume53
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2004

Fingerprint

child well-being
family work
Child Welfare
welfare
reform
Family Planning Policy
income
Aptitude
family policy
self-sufficiency
social integration
costs
qualitative interview
Self Concept
self-esteem
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Emotions
low income
Interviews
energy

Keywords

  • Child well-being
  • Family
  • Low-wage work
  • Maternal employment
  • Welfare reform
  • Work-family

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Welfare Reform, Work-Family Tradeoffs, and Child Well-Being. / London, Andrew S; Scott, Ellen K.; Edin, Kathryn; Hunter, Vicki.

In: Family Relations, Vol. 53, No. 2, 03.2004, p. 148-158.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

London, Andrew S ; Scott, Ellen K. ; Edin, Kathryn ; Hunter, Vicki. / Welfare Reform, Work-Family Tradeoffs, and Child Well-Being. In: Family Relations. 2004 ; Vol. 53, No. 2. pp. 148-158.
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