'We eat meat every day': Ecology and economy of dietary change among Oaxacan migrants from Mexico to New Jersey

Peter J. Guarnaccia, Teresa Vivar, Anne C. Bellows, Gabriela V. Alcaraz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

In the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, the USA has experienced large-scale and continuing immigration from around the world, especially Latin America and, within Latin America, from Mexico. One dimension of these transnational processes is dietary change. In this paper, we qualitatively assess the effects of migration from Oaxaca, Mexico to central New Jersey on the ecology and economy of dietary patterns. We explore multiple factors at the micro and macro levels. Data come from focus groups held among Mexican migrants in New Jersey, and in Oaxaca among people from their sending communities. Economic constraints and lack of culturally appropriate foods are larger barriers to healthy eating than lack of knowledge about appropriate diets. We end with recommendations for nutrition education and interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)104-119
Number of pages16
JournalEthnic and Racial Studies
Volume35
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Dietary change
  • Mexico
  • New Jersey
  • acculturation
  • migration
  • transnational and trans-border

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Anthropology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of ''We eat meat every day': Ecology and economy of dietary change among Oaxacan migrants from Mexico to New Jersey'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this