We don't need no stinkin' badges

The impact of reward features and feeling rewarded in educational games

Brian McKernan, Rosa Mikeal Martey, Jennifer Stromer-Galley, Kate Kenski, Benjamin A. Clegg, James E. Folkestad, Matthew G. Rhodes, Adrienne Shaw, Emilie T. Saulnier, Tomek Strzalkowski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Drawing from recent research on the ability of video games to satisfy psychological needs, this paper identifies how the presence of rewards influences learning complex concepts and tasks using an educational video game. We designed and developed two 60-min educational games with and without a range of reward features and examined learning outcomes among 242 participants in university laboratories. Although both games improved learning, analyses suggest that the quantity of in-game rewards did not have an impact on biased behavior avoidance or knowledge about biases. To further illuminate these findings, we examined perceptions of feeling rewarded and found that those who felt more rewarded had more favorable views of the gameplay experience, but they did not demonstrate different learning outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)299-306
Number of pages8
JournalComputers in Human Behavior
Volume45
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

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Reward
Emotions
Learning
Video Games
Avoidance Learning
Aptitude
Psychology
Education
Research
Learning Outcomes

Keywords

  • Cognitive biases
  • Educational games
  • Learning
  • Rewards
  • Video games

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Psychology(all)
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

We don't need no stinkin' badges : The impact of reward features and feeling rewarded in educational games. / McKernan, Brian; Martey, Rosa Mikeal; Stromer-Galley, Jennifer; Kenski, Kate; Clegg, Benjamin A.; Folkestad, James E.; Rhodes, Matthew G.; Shaw, Adrienne; Saulnier, Emilie T.; Strzalkowski, Tomek.

In: Computers in Human Behavior, Vol. 45, 2015, p. 299-306.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McKernan, B, Martey, RM, Stromer-Galley, J, Kenski, K, Clegg, BA, Folkestad, JE, Rhodes, MG, Shaw, A, Saulnier, ET & Strzalkowski, T 2015, 'We don't need no stinkin' badges: The impact of reward features and feeling rewarded in educational games', Computers in Human Behavior, vol. 45, pp. 299-306. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2014.12.028
McKernan, Brian ; Martey, Rosa Mikeal ; Stromer-Galley, Jennifer ; Kenski, Kate ; Clegg, Benjamin A. ; Folkestad, James E. ; Rhodes, Matthew G. ; Shaw, Adrienne ; Saulnier, Emilie T. ; Strzalkowski, Tomek. / We don't need no stinkin' badges : The impact of reward features and feeling rewarded in educational games. In: Computers in Human Behavior. 2015 ; Vol. 45. pp. 299-306.
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