Water resources

Sustaining quality and quantity

Karen Kabbes, Joseph Reichenberger, Cody Briggs, Cliff Ian Davidson, Alan Perks

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This chapter addresses issues of water quantity and quality, impacts of development on surface waters and waterway connectivity, and changing hydrologic conditions (nonstationarity). Wastewater treatment plants, now considered resource recovery facilities, could potentially provide different levels of water treatment based on the proposed water use. Some issues related to water quality are surface water runoff and the impact of impervious surfaces. Methods to address reduced water quality from nonpoint sources have been developed, in addition to aquatic habitat connectivity and fish passage. Working in interdisciplinary teams, civil engineers have assisted in developing best management practices, low impact development, and green infrastructure that use or mimic naturally occurring ecosystem services to address stormwater quality and quantity and aquatic habitat.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationEngineering for Sustainable Communities
Subtitle of host publicationPrinciples and Practices
PublisherAmerican Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)
Pages237-253
Number of pages17
ISBN (Electronic)9780784480755
ISBN (Print)9780784414811
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

Water resources
Surface waters
Water quality
connectivity
water resource
surface water
water quality
best management practice
habitat
Runoff
Water treatment
stormwater
ecosystem service
Wastewater treatment
Ecosystems
Fish
water use
Water
water treatment
infrastructure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Kabbes, K., Reichenberger, J., Briggs, C., Davidson, C. I., & Perks, A. (2017). Water resources: Sustaining quality and quantity. In Engineering for Sustainable Communities: Principles and Practices (pp. 237-253). American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). https://doi.org/10.1061/9780784414811.ch16

Water resources : Sustaining quality and quantity. / Kabbes, Karen; Reichenberger, Joseph; Briggs, Cody; Davidson, Cliff Ian; Perks, Alan.

Engineering for Sustainable Communities: Principles and Practices. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2017. p. 237-253.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Kabbes, K, Reichenberger, J, Briggs, C, Davidson, CI & Perks, A 2017, Water resources: Sustaining quality and quantity. in Engineering for Sustainable Communities: Principles and Practices. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), pp. 237-253. https://doi.org/10.1061/9780784414811.ch16
Kabbes K, Reichenberger J, Briggs C, Davidson CI, Perks A. Water resources: Sustaining quality and quantity. In Engineering for Sustainable Communities: Principles and Practices. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). 2017. p. 237-253 https://doi.org/10.1061/9780784414811.ch16
Kabbes, Karen ; Reichenberger, Joseph ; Briggs, Cody ; Davidson, Cliff Ian ; Perks, Alan. / Water resources : Sustaining quality and quantity. Engineering for Sustainable Communities: Principles and Practices. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2017. pp. 237-253
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