Unjamming and cell shape in the asthmatic airway epithelium

Jin Ah Park, Jae Hun Kim, Dapeng Bi, Jennifer A. Mitchel, Nader Taheri Qazvini, Kelan Tantisira, Chan Young Park, Maureen McGill, Sae Hoon Kim, Bomi Gweon, Jacob Notbohm, Robert Steward, Stephanie Burger, Scott H. Randell, Alvin T. Kho, Dhananjay T. Tambe, Corey Hardin, Stephanie A. Shore, Elliot Israel, David A. Weitz & 7 others Daniel J. Tschumperlin, Elizabeth P. Henske, Scott T. Weiss, Mary Elizabeth Manning, James P. Butler, Jeffrey M. Drazen, Jeffrey J. Fredberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

121 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

From coffee beans flowing in a chute to cells remodelling in a living tissue, a wide variety of close-packed collective systems - both inert and living - have the potential to jam. The collective can sometimes flow like a fluid or jam and rigidify like a solid. The unjammed-to-jammed transition remains poorly understood, however, and structural properties characterizing these phases remain unknown. Using primary human bronchial epithelial cells, we show that the jamming transition in asthma is linked to cell shape, thus establishing in that system a structural criterion for cell jamming. Surprisingly, the collapse of critical scaling predicts a counter-intuitive relationship between jamming, cell shape and cell-cell adhesive stresses that is borne out by direct experimental observations. Cell shape thus provides a rigorous structural signature for classification and investigation of bronchial epithelial layer jamming in asthma, and potentially in any process in disease or development in which epithelial dynamics play a prominent role.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1040-1048
Number of pages9
JournalNature Materials
Volume14
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 3 2015

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epithelium
Jamming
jamming
cells
asthma
Coffee
Structural properties
Adhesives
coffee
Tissue
Fluids
chutes
adhesives
counters
signatures
scaling
fluids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Chemistry(all)

Cite this

Park, J. A., Kim, J. H., Bi, D., Mitchel, J. A., Qazvini, N. T., Tantisira, K., ... Fredberg, J. J. (2015). Unjamming and cell shape in the asthmatic airway epithelium. Nature Materials, 14(10), 1040-1048. https://doi.org/10.1038/nmat4357

Unjamming and cell shape in the asthmatic airway epithelium. / Park, Jin Ah; Kim, Jae Hun; Bi, Dapeng; Mitchel, Jennifer A.; Qazvini, Nader Taheri; Tantisira, Kelan; Park, Chan Young; McGill, Maureen; Kim, Sae Hoon; Gweon, Bomi; Notbohm, Jacob; Steward, Robert; Burger, Stephanie; Randell, Scott H.; Kho, Alvin T.; Tambe, Dhananjay T.; Hardin, Corey; Shore, Stephanie A.; Israel, Elliot; Weitz, David A.; Tschumperlin, Daniel J.; Henske, Elizabeth P.; Weiss, Scott T.; Manning, Mary Elizabeth; Butler, James P.; Drazen, Jeffrey M.; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.

In: Nature Materials, Vol. 14, No. 10, 03.08.2015, p. 1040-1048.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Park, JA, Kim, JH, Bi, D, Mitchel, JA, Qazvini, NT, Tantisira, K, Park, CY, McGill, M, Kim, SH, Gweon, B, Notbohm, J, Steward, R, Burger, S, Randell, SH, Kho, AT, Tambe, DT, Hardin, C, Shore, SA, Israel, E, Weitz, DA, Tschumperlin, DJ, Henske, EP, Weiss, ST, Manning, ME, Butler, JP, Drazen, JM & Fredberg, JJ 2015, 'Unjamming and cell shape in the asthmatic airway epithelium', Nature Materials, vol. 14, no. 10, pp. 1040-1048. https://doi.org/10.1038/nmat4357
Park JA, Kim JH, Bi D, Mitchel JA, Qazvini NT, Tantisira K et al. Unjamming and cell shape in the asthmatic airway epithelium. Nature Materials. 2015 Aug 3;14(10):1040-1048. https://doi.org/10.1038/nmat4357
Park, Jin Ah ; Kim, Jae Hun ; Bi, Dapeng ; Mitchel, Jennifer A. ; Qazvini, Nader Taheri ; Tantisira, Kelan ; Park, Chan Young ; McGill, Maureen ; Kim, Sae Hoon ; Gweon, Bomi ; Notbohm, Jacob ; Steward, Robert ; Burger, Stephanie ; Randell, Scott H. ; Kho, Alvin T. ; Tambe, Dhananjay T. ; Hardin, Corey ; Shore, Stephanie A. ; Israel, Elliot ; Weitz, David A. ; Tschumperlin, Daniel J. ; Henske, Elizabeth P. ; Weiss, Scott T. ; Manning, Mary Elizabeth ; Butler, James P. ; Drazen, Jeffrey M. ; Fredberg, Jeffrey J. / Unjamming and cell shape in the asthmatic airway epithelium. In: Nature Materials. 2015 ; Vol. 14, No. 10. pp. 1040-1048.
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