Trust in human-computer interactions as measured by frustration, surprise, and workload

Leanne M. Hirshfield, Stuart H. Hirshfield, Samuel Hincks, Matthew Russell, Rachel Ward, Tom Williams

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

We describe preliminary research that attempts to quantify the level of trust that exists in typical interactions between human users and their computer systems. We describe the cognitive and emotional states that are correlated to trust, and we present preliminary experiments using functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) and electroencephalography (EEG) to measure these user states. Our long term goal is to run experiments that manipulate users' level of trust in their interactions with the computer and to measure these effects via non-invasive brain measurement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationFoundations of Augmented Cognition
Subtitle of host publicationDirecting the Future of Adaptive Systems - 6th International Conference, FAC 2011, Held as Part of HCI International 2011, Proceedings
Pages507-516
Number of pages10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 19 2011
Externally publishedYes
Event6th International Conference on Foundations of Augmented Cognition, FAC 2011, Held as Part of HCI International 2011 - Orlando, FL, United States
Duration: Jul 9 2011Jul 14 2011

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume6780 LNAI
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Other

Other6th International Conference on Foundations of Augmented Cognition, FAC 2011, Held as Part of HCI International 2011
CountryUnited States
CityOrlando, FL
Period7/9/117/14/11

Keywords

  • EEG
  • electroencephalograph
  • fNIRS
  • frustration
  • near-infrared spectroscopy
  • surprise
  • trust
  • workload

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Theoretical Computer Science
  • Computer Science(all)

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  • Cite this

    Hirshfield, L. M., Hirshfield, S. H., Hincks, S., Russell, M., Ward, R., & Williams, T. (2011). Trust in human-computer interactions as measured by frustration, surprise, and workload. In Foundations of Augmented Cognition: Directing the Future of Adaptive Systems - 6th International Conference, FAC 2011, Held as Part of HCI International 2011, Proceedings (pp. 507-516). (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 6780 LNAI). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-21852-1_58