Triggering participation: Exploring the effects of third-person and hostile media perceptions on online participation

Myojung Chung, Greg J. Munno, Brian Moritz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Abstract Using a 2 × 3 mixed between-within subjects experiment (N = 102), we tested how the presence of online comments affects self-other differences and perceptions of media bias, as well as factors predicting subjects' likelihood of commenting on an online news story. We found that (a) presence of comments lowers self-other differences and consequently attenuates the third-person effect, and (b) perceptions of media bias significantly predict likelihood of commenting. Additionally, we found that subjects were more likely to comment on stories they found biased against their position as a form of corrective action, and that subjects were more likely to share and like stories they found biased in favor of their position as a form of promotional action.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number3547
Pages (from-to)452-461
Number of pages10
JournalComputers in Human Behavior
Volume53
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 25 2015

Keywords

  • Digital news
  • Hostile media perception
  • Online participation
  • Third-person effect

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Psychology(all)

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