Titanium is not "the most biocompatible metal" under cathodic potential: The relationship between voltage and MC3T3 preosteoblast behavior on electrically polarized cpTi surfaces

Mark T. Ehrensberger, Shiril Sivan, Jeremy L. Gilbert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

44 Scopus citations

Abstract

An electrochemically controlled system has been developed which allows for cell culture directly on electrically polarized metal surfaces with simultaneous control and assessment of the electrochemical current, potential, and impedance of the interface. This system was utilized in this study to assess the interactions between electrochemically polarized commercially pure titanium (cpTi) and MC3T3 preosteoblast cells. Cells were cultured on CpTi for 24 h at static potentials between -1000 mV and +1000 mV vs. Ag/AgCl and cell morphology (SEM and cell area) and viability (MTT and Live-Dead assay) were assessed along with the electrochemical current densities and surface oxide impedance properties. The results indicate that cathodic polarization in the range of -600 mV to -1000 mV markedly reduces the spreading and viability of cells cultured directly on cpTi within 24 h, while anodic polarization (-300 mV to +1000 mV) out to 72 h shows no difference in cell behavior as compared to the OCP condition. Analysis of the relationship between the cell outcomes and the electrochemical current densities and impedance indicated the presence of voltage-dependent electrochemical thresholds (cathodic current density, i c > 1.0 μA/cm2, Rp < 105 Ω cm2) which may control the biocompatibility of cpTi. In addition, these outcomes have direct clinical significance for modular orthopedic implants whose potential can shift, via fretting corrosion, down into the range of potentials exhibiting poor cell behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1500-1509
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part A
Volume93
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 15 2010

Keywords

  • Bone cell culture
  • Electrical stimulation
  • Electrochemical impedance
  • Fretting
  • Titanium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Metals and Alloys

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