Thirty-five years of secondary succession in a Festuca viridula- Lupinus latifolius dominated meadow at Sunrise, Mount Rainier National Park, Washington.

D. A. Frank, R. Del Moral

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Aster alpigenus, Carex spectabilis, Juncus drummondii and Potentilla flabellifolia, all relatively uncommon in the surrounding undisturbed meadow, have dominated the disturbed area since 1960. All of these species produce many dispersible seeds. Festuca viridula and Lupinus latifolius, dominants in the surrounding meadow, are uncommon in the disturbed area. Poorly dispersed seeds of L. latifolius and extremely low viable seed production and poor seedling survival of Festuca viridula appear to be reasons. The development of a Festuca-Lupinus dominated community in the disturbed area may eventually occur, but the alternative outcome, a permanently deflected succession producing a community dominated by successful colonists, appears more likely.-from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1232-1236
Number of pages5
JournalCanadian Journal of Botany
Volume64
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1986
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Thirty-five years of secondary succession in a Festuca viridula- Lupinus latifolius dominated meadow at Sunrise, Mount Rainier National Park, Washington.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this