The Transition from School to Work for Children of Immigrants with Lower-Level Educational Credentials in the United States and France

Amy C Lutz, Yaël Brinbaum, Dalia Abdelhady

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper compares the transition from school to work among Mexican-origin youth in the United States and North African-origin youth in France relative to the native-majority youth with similar low-level credentials. The goal is to understand the extent to which these groups experience ethnic penalties in the labor market not explained by social class, low-level credentials, or other characteristics. The patterns of employment for second-generation minorities play out differently in the two contexts. In France, lack of access to jobs is a source of disadvantage for North African children of immigrants, while in the united States, second-generation Mexicans do not suffer from a lack of employment. Indeed, the Mexican second-generation shows a uniquely high level of employment. We argue that high levels of youth unemployment in the society, as is the case in France, means greater ethnic penalties for second-generation minorities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)227-254
Number of pages28
JournalComparative Migration Studies
Volume2
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2014

Fingerprint

immigrant
France
Penalty
penalty
minority
youth unemployment
Unemployment
lack
unemployment
labor market
social class
transition from school to work
Education
Children
youth
school
Immigrants
Educational level
experience
Group

Keywords

  • children of immigrants
  • employment
  • Labor market
  • Mexicans
  • North Africans
  • second generation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Law
  • Statistics, Probability and Uncertainty

Cite this

The Transition from School to Work for Children of Immigrants with Lower-Level Educational Credentials in the United States and France. / Lutz, Amy C; Brinbaum, Yaël; Abdelhady, Dalia.

In: Comparative Migration Studies, Vol. 2, No. 2, 01.06.2014, p. 227-254.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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