The Third-Person Effect of Online Advertising of Cosmetic Surgery: A Path Model for Predicting Restrictive Versus Corrective Actions

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36 Scopus citations

Abstract

Using survey data with a national representative of U.S. adult women, the current study tested both the perceptual and behavioral hypotheses for the third-person effect of online advertising of cosmetic surgery (OACS) in a theoretical process model. A strong third-person perception (TPP) was observed in assessing the influence of OACS. The results of a path analysis revealed that the self–other exposure gap and social undesirability were positive predictors of the TPP. TPP had a direct impact on support for regulation (SFR) of OACS and an indirect effect on corrective actions. Both SFR and online political self-efficacy (OPSE) were the good predictors for corrective actions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)972-993
Number of pages22
JournalJournalism and Mass Communication Quarterly
Volume94
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

Keywords

  • censorship
  • corrective actions
  • cosmetic surgery advertising
  • self-efficacy
  • social desirability
  • third-person effect

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication

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