The social media innovation challenge in the public sector

Ines Mergel

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The use of social media applications has been widely accepted in the U.S. government. Many of the social media strategies and day-to-day tactics have also been adopted around the world as part of local Open Government Initiatives and the worldwide Open Government Partnership. Nevertheless, the acceptance and broader adoption of sophisticated tactics that go beyond information and education paradigm such as true engagement or networking strategies are still in its infancy. Rapid diffusion is challenged by informal bottom-up experimentation that meets institutional and organizational challenges hindering innovative tactics. Going forward governments and bureaucratic organizations are also facing the challenge to show the impact of their social media interactions. Each of these challenges is discussed in this article and extraordinary examples, that are not widely adopted yet, are provided to show how government organizations can potentially overcome these challenges.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationICT, Public Administration and Democracy in the Coming Decade
EditorsAlbert Meijer, Frank Bannister, Marcel Thaens
Pages71-82
Number of pages12
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 27 2013

Publication series

NameInnovation and the Public Sector
Volume20
ISSN (Print)1871-1073
ISSN (Electronic)0928-9038

Keywords

  • ICT adoption
  • Social media
  • Social networking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Public Administration
  • Management of Technology and Innovation

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  • Cite this

    Mergel, I. (2013). The social media innovation challenge in the public sector. In A. Meijer, F. Bannister, & M. Thaens (Eds.), ICT, Public Administration and Democracy in the Coming Decade (pp. 71-82). (Innovation and the Public Sector; Vol. 20). https://doi.org/10.3233/978-1-61499-244-8-71