The science of humanity and the humanity of science: Perspectives on Ed Zigler's contributions to developmental psychopathology and the study of all children

Jacob A. Burack, David W. Evans, Jenilee Sarah Napoleon, Vanessa K. Weva, Natalie Russo, Grace Iarocci

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

We present this article as a testament to Ed Zigler's commitment to science in the service of humanity and to policy based on conceptually compelling theory and methodologically rigorous science. In doing so, we highlight ways that Ed's universal and inclusive developmental world view, early training as a behaviorist, exacting scientific standards, concern for others, and appreciation of his own roots and upbringing all transformed the way that many different groups of people of all ages and backgrounds are studied, viewed, and intervened with by researchers, policy makers, and society at large. Ed's narrative of development rather than defect, universality rather than difference, and holistic rather than reductionist continues to compel us in the quest for a kinder, more inclusive, and enabling society. Conversely, Ed's behaviorist training as a graduate student also influenced him throughout his career and was essential to his career-long commitment to systemic action in the service of improving the lives of others. We cite the lessons that we, as his descendants, learned from Ed and apply them to our own areas of research with populations that Ed did not study, but had considerable interest in - persons with autism spectrum disorder and Indigenous youth.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)441-452
Number of pages12
JournalDevelopment and Psychopathology
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2021

Keywords

  • Ed Zigler
  • Indigenous youth
  • autism spectrum disorder
  • developmental approach
  • intellectual disability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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