The role of wishful identification, emotional engagement, and parasocial relationships in repeated viewing of live-streaming games: A social cognitive theory perspective

Joon Soo Lim, Min Ji Choe, Jun Zhang, Ghee Young Noh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

87 Scopus citations

Abstract

Grounded in Bandura's (2001) social cognitive theory of mass communication and Giles' (2002) model of parasocial relationship (PSR) development, the current research examines how a viewer's wishful identification with an online video game streaming personality and emotional engagement with other viewers lead to behavioral loyalty through PSR with their favorite live-streamer. To test the proposed mediation model, the researchers conducted a survey using a representative sample drawn from a national panel of a professional survey firm in South Korea. Results of a mediation analysis employing structural equation modeling reveal that both wishful identification and emotional engagement have indirect effects on behavioral loyalty through PSR. Put another way, a viewer's likeliness to continue viewing a live-streaming game increase as the viewer develops stronger PSR. The current research also demonstrates that wishful identification and engagement with others/streamers develop into PSR, as suggested by Giles' PSR development model.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number106327
JournalComputers in Human Behavior
Volume108
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2020

Keywords

  • Behavioral loyalty
  • Emotional engagement
  • Live-streaming games
  • Parasocial relationship
  • Social cognitive theory
  • Wishful identification

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Psychology(all)

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