The role of degree attainment in the differential impact of job corps on adolescents and young adults

Maria Bampasidou, Carlos A. Flores, Alfonso Flores-Lagunes, Daniel J. Parisian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Job Corps is the United State's largest and most comprehensive training program for disadvantaged youth aged 16 24 years old. A randomized social experiment concluded that, on average, individuals benefited from the program in the form of higher weekly earnings and employment prospects. At the same time, "young adults" (ages 20 24) realized much higher impacts relative to "adolescents" (ages 16 19). Employing recent nonparametric bounds for causal mediation, we investigate whether these two groups disparate effects correspond to them benefiting differentially from distinct aspects of Job Corps, with a particular focus on the attainment of a degree (GED, high school, or vocational). We find that, for young adults, the part of the total effect of Job Corps on.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)113-156
Number of pages44
JournalResearch in Labor Economics
Volume40
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Causal mediation
  • Degree attainment
  • Job Corps training program
  • Nonparametric bounds

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Industrial relations
  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Political Science and International Relations

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