The role of athletic identity in the relationship between difficulty thinking or concentrating and academic service use in NCAA student-athletes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The NCAA Growth, Opportunities, Aspirations and Learning of Students in College data were used to explore the relationship between self-reported high levels of difficulties thinking or concentrating and grade point average (GPA) in college student-athletes. We specifically investigated the mediators of the relationship between self-reported high levels of difficulties thinking or concentrating and GPA. Results revealed there was a significant indirect effect between self-reporting the highest level of difficulties thinking or concentrating and service use through GPA, moderated by identity, full model: F(4, 14738) = 184.28, p <.001; R2 =.22. The athletic/academic identity variable acted as a moderator of the mediating effect of GPA on the relationship between self-reported high levels of difficulties thinking or concentrating and the use of academic resources on campus. If a student-athlete who is self-reporting high levels of difficulties thinking or concentrating identifies more as a student, GPA is likely to prompt academic service use. However, if the student-athlete identifies more as an athlete, GPA is less likely to lead to use of campus academic support resources.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)309-323
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Clinical Sport Psychology
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

Keywords

  • Academic services
  • Athletic identity
  • Cognition
  • College student-athlete
  • Social identity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

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