The promise of the internet for disability: A study of on-line services and web site accessibility at centers for independent living

Heather Ritchie, Peter Blanck

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

79 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Internet provides individuals with disabilities numerous tools to live independently. In the convenience of the home, a person can access an abundance of information, an electronic community, updates on the latest disability advocacy news, education through distance-learning classes, and on-line shopping for books, clothes, assistive technology, and a host of other consumer goods. Centers for Independent Living (CILs) are consumer-run, nonprofit grassroots disability service organizations at the forefront of the disability rights movement. Providing services to individuals across the range of disabilities, CILs have begun to use the Internet as a complement to their traditional service delivery methods. This article examines the emerging trend of independent living services on the web. The investigation examines 200 CIL Internet sites across the United States during the period of April to August 2001. Information is collected and analyzed about how CILs are using the Internet to provide their services and programs. In addition, the article examines the technological accessibility of their web sites. Implications of the findings for CILs, consumers with disabilities, and disability policy are examined.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5-26
Number of pages22
JournalBehavioral Sciences and the Law
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 6 2003
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Law

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The promise of the internet for disability: A study of on-line services and web site accessibility at centers for independent living'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this