The influence of veteran status, psychiatric diagnosis, and traumatic brain injury on inadequate sleep

Andrew S London, Sarah A. Burgard, Janet M Wilmoth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Adequate sleep is essential for health, social participation, and well-being. We use 2010 and 2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data (N = 35,602) to examine differences in sleep adequacy between: non-veterans; non-combat veterans with no psychiatric diagnosis or traumatic brain injury (TBI); combat veterans with no psychiatric diagnosis or TBI; and veterans (non-combat and combat combined) with a psychiatric diagnosis and/or TBI. On average, respondents reported 9.28 days of inadequate sleep; veterans with a psychiatric diagnosis and/or TBI reported the most—12.25 days. Multivariate analyses indicated that veterans with a psychiatric diagnosis and/or TBI had significantly more days of inadequate sleep than all other groups. Findings contribute to a growing literature on the relevance of the military service–psychiatric diagnosis–TBI nexus for sleep problems by using population-representative data and non-veteran and healthy veteran comparison groups. This research underscores the importance of screening and treating veterans for sleep problems, and can be used by social workers and health professionals to advocate for increased education and research about sleep problems among veterans with mental health problems and/or TBI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)49-67
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Sociology and Social Welfare
Volume41
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

Fingerprint

sleep
brain
social participation
health professionals
social worker
surveillance
Group
well-being
mental health
Military
health
education

Keywords

  • Mental health
  • Sleep
  • Traumatic brain injury
  • Veterans

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

The influence of veteran status, psychiatric diagnosis, and traumatic brain injury on inadequate sleep. / London, Andrew S; Burgard, Sarah A.; Wilmoth, Janet M.

In: Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare, Vol. 41, No. 4, 01.12.2014, p. 49-67.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{82f4c1f2ab444de0986e2df6e639620a,
title = "The influence of veteran status, psychiatric diagnosis, and traumatic brain injury on inadequate sleep",
abstract = "Adequate sleep is essential for health, social participation, and well-being. We use 2010 and 2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data (N = 35,602) to examine differences in sleep adequacy between: non-veterans; non-combat veterans with no psychiatric diagnosis or traumatic brain injury (TBI); combat veterans with no psychiatric diagnosis or TBI; and veterans (non-combat and combat combined) with a psychiatric diagnosis and/or TBI. On average, respondents reported 9.28 days of inadequate sleep; veterans with a psychiatric diagnosis and/or TBI reported the most—12.25 days. Multivariate analyses indicated that veterans with a psychiatric diagnosis and/or TBI had significantly more days of inadequate sleep than all other groups. Findings contribute to a growing literature on the relevance of the military service–psychiatric diagnosis–TBI nexus for sleep problems by using population-representative data and non-veteran and healthy veteran comparison groups. This research underscores the importance of screening and treating veterans for sleep problems, and can be used by social workers and health professionals to advocate for increased education and research about sleep problems among veterans with mental health problems and/or TBI.",
keywords = "Mental health, Sleep, Traumatic brain injury, Veterans",
author = "London, {Andrew S} and Burgard, {Sarah A.} and Wilmoth, {Janet M}",
year = "2014",
month = "12",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "41",
pages = "49--67",
journal = "Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare",
issn = "0191-5096",
publisher = "Western Michigan University",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The influence of veteran status, psychiatric diagnosis, and traumatic brain injury on inadequate sleep

AU - London, Andrew S

AU - Burgard, Sarah A.

AU - Wilmoth, Janet M

PY - 2014/12/1

Y1 - 2014/12/1

N2 - Adequate sleep is essential for health, social participation, and well-being. We use 2010 and 2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data (N = 35,602) to examine differences in sleep adequacy between: non-veterans; non-combat veterans with no psychiatric diagnosis or traumatic brain injury (TBI); combat veterans with no psychiatric diagnosis or TBI; and veterans (non-combat and combat combined) with a psychiatric diagnosis and/or TBI. On average, respondents reported 9.28 days of inadequate sleep; veterans with a psychiatric diagnosis and/or TBI reported the most—12.25 days. Multivariate analyses indicated that veterans with a psychiatric diagnosis and/or TBI had significantly more days of inadequate sleep than all other groups. Findings contribute to a growing literature on the relevance of the military service–psychiatric diagnosis–TBI nexus for sleep problems by using population-representative data and non-veteran and healthy veteran comparison groups. This research underscores the importance of screening and treating veterans for sleep problems, and can be used by social workers and health professionals to advocate for increased education and research about sleep problems among veterans with mental health problems and/or TBI.

AB - Adequate sleep is essential for health, social participation, and well-being. We use 2010 and 2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data (N = 35,602) to examine differences in sleep adequacy between: non-veterans; non-combat veterans with no psychiatric diagnosis or traumatic brain injury (TBI); combat veterans with no psychiatric diagnosis or TBI; and veterans (non-combat and combat combined) with a psychiatric diagnosis and/or TBI. On average, respondents reported 9.28 days of inadequate sleep; veterans with a psychiatric diagnosis and/or TBI reported the most—12.25 days. Multivariate analyses indicated that veterans with a psychiatric diagnosis and/or TBI had significantly more days of inadequate sleep than all other groups. Findings contribute to a growing literature on the relevance of the military service–psychiatric diagnosis–TBI nexus for sleep problems by using population-representative data and non-veteran and healthy veteran comparison groups. This research underscores the importance of screening and treating veterans for sleep problems, and can be used by social workers and health professionals to advocate for increased education and research about sleep problems among veterans with mental health problems and/or TBI.

KW - Mental health

KW - Sleep

KW - Traumatic brain injury

KW - Veterans

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84919924050&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84919924050&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84919924050

VL - 41

SP - 49

EP - 67

JO - Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare

JF - Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare

SN - 0191-5096

IS - 4

ER -