The influence of remarriage on the racial difference in mother-only families in 1910

Andrew S London, Cheryl Elman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Historical demography documents that mother-only families were more common among African Americans than among Euro-Americans early in the twentieth century. We find direct evidence that African American males in both first and higher-order marriages were more likely to have (re)married previously married women and were more likely to have (re)married women with children. This racial difference in (re)marital partner choice reduced the racial difference in the prevalence of mother-only families such that, in the absence of such remarriage choices, the prevalence of mother-only families in the turn-of-the-century African American population would have been even higher than has been reported. Remarriage in this period countered the various demographic, economic, cultural, and social-institutional forces that disproportionately destabilized African American marriages; it must be taken into account more fully by analysts concerned with racial differences in family structure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)283-297
Number of pages15
JournalDemography
Volume38
Issue number2
StatePublished - May 2001
Externally publishedYes

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remarriage
wife
marriage
demography
family structure
twentieth century
American
evidence
economics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography

Cite this

The influence of remarriage on the racial difference in mother-only families in 1910. / London, Andrew S; Elman, Cheryl.

In: Demography, Vol. 38, No. 2, 05.2001, p. 283-297.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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