The importance of dialogue: communication strategy for empowerment of low-income African American patients via in-depth interviews of primary care providers at inner-city health clinics

Rania W. Frederick, Moon J. Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: We explored how primary care providers perceive their interactions with low-income African American patients at two inner-city health clinics. Background: Drawing from theories of empowerment and community development, we asked what types of communication strategies health care providers consider crucial for creating/maintaining empowered low-income African American patients. Method: We conducted twelve in-depth interviews and performed data analysis to identify recurring themes and report them within the scope of the qualitative nature of the current data. Results: Healthcare providers reported that they are fully aware of and actively use the patient-centered/collaborative strategies identified in the literature. They expressed their desire/willingness to work with their patients as partners in patient health management/improvement rather than simply instructing them. They also prefer highly motivated patients to improve their own health outcomes. Conclusion: Overall findings suggest providers, working in inner-city health clinics, understand and use accommodating/collaborating and patient-centered strategies daily to empower their low-income African American patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)23-31
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Communication in Healthcare
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • African-American patients
  • healthcare delivery
  • Patient empowerment
  • physician-patient relations
  • primary care
  • underserved populations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Health Information Management

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