The Imperial Self: A perspective on Anglo-America from South Africa, India, and Ireland

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

In the late 1800s, South African leaders were active participants in “an imagined community of white men” that spanned the British Empire and the United States. 2 They and their counterparts in Australia, New Zealand, British Columbia, and California shared the assumption that democracy required the exclusion of nonwhite people. As part of expanding self-rule, the Dominions gained the right to regulate immigration, an issue viewed as critical for retaining white superiority. 3 The resulting exclusion of Asians, politically and physically, inscribed a racial hierarchy between whites and non-whites. Ironically, a racist Anglo-American collective identity was thus constructed by advocates of “democracy.”.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAnglo-America and its Discontents
Subtitle of host publicationCivilizational Identities beyond West and East
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages81-104
Number of pages24
ISBN (Electronic)9781136459221
ISBN (Print)9780415809542
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

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