The Impact of War Violence Exposure and Psychological Distress on Parenting Practices Among a Sample of Young Adults Affected by War Postconflict Sierra Leone

Binta Alleyne-Green, Alex Kulick, Kimberly Bonds Grocher, Kendra P. DeLoach McCutcheon, Theresa S. Betancourt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

In postconflict regions, child soldiers and youth affected by these wars of the 1990s to 2000s are now parents raising children. To our knowledge, no research to date has examined the impact of war violence exposure and psychological distress on parenting practices among this population in postconflict Sierra Leone. Using data from a longitudinal study conducted in collaboration with a major nongovernment organization, this study aimed to fill this gap in our knowledge. Results indicate that wartime violence perpetration was associated with posttraumatic stress disorder and sad heart. More men reported
experiencing a “sad heart” than women. Finally, both exposure to violence and parenting confidence were associated with higher nurturing behaviors. The findings of this study suggest that despite the gravity of war-related trauma on this population, these individuals are very nurturing toward their children and less likely to engage in physical discipline.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)325-334
Number of pages10
JournalPeace and Conflict
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 20 2019

Keywords

  • war
  • parenting
  • psychological distress
  • postconflict

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