The Impact of Employment on Parental Coresidence

Gary Engelhardt, Michael D. Eriksen, Nadia Greenhalgh-Stanley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

We examine the extent to which parents use housing and shared living arrangements as a form of risk-sharing for their adult children, using detailed data on children and parents in the Health and Retirement Study for 1998-2012. On average, a young man moving from full-time to nonemployment raises the likelihood of coresiding with a parent by 1.5 percentage points; moving from full-time employment to being part-time employed raises the likelihood of coresiding with a parent by 2 percentage points. The implied elasticity of parental coresidence with respect to the son's income is -1.1; for daughters, the elasticity is -0.5.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalReal Estate Economics
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2016

Fingerprint

Elasticity
Coresidence
Income
Young men
Health and Retirement Study
Living arrangements
Risk sharing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Finance
  • Accounting
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

The Impact of Employment on Parental Coresidence. / Engelhardt, Gary; Eriksen, Michael D.; Greenhalgh-Stanley, Nadia.

In: Real Estate Economics, 2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Engelhardt, Gary ; Eriksen, Michael D. ; Greenhalgh-Stanley, Nadia. / The Impact of Employment on Parental Coresidence. In: Real Estate Economics. 2016.
@article{f38813e943bd474081df6551e817bffc,
title = "The Impact of Employment on Parental Coresidence",
abstract = "We examine the extent to which parents use housing and shared living arrangements as a form of risk-sharing for their adult children, using detailed data on children and parents in the Health and Retirement Study for 1998-2012. On average, a young man moving from full-time to nonemployment raises the likelihood of coresiding with a parent by 1.5 percentage points; moving from full-time employment to being part-time employed raises the likelihood of coresiding with a parent by 2 percentage points. The implied elasticity of parental coresidence with respect to the son's income is -1.1; for daughters, the elasticity is -0.5.",
author = "Gary Engelhardt and Eriksen, {Michael D.} and Nadia Greenhalgh-Stanley",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1111/1540-6229.12152",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Real Estate Economics",
issn = "1080-8620",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Impact of Employment on Parental Coresidence

AU - Engelhardt, Gary

AU - Eriksen, Michael D.

AU - Greenhalgh-Stanley, Nadia

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - We examine the extent to which parents use housing and shared living arrangements as a form of risk-sharing for their adult children, using detailed data on children and parents in the Health and Retirement Study for 1998-2012. On average, a young man moving from full-time to nonemployment raises the likelihood of coresiding with a parent by 1.5 percentage points; moving from full-time employment to being part-time employed raises the likelihood of coresiding with a parent by 2 percentage points. The implied elasticity of parental coresidence with respect to the son's income is -1.1; for daughters, the elasticity is -0.5.

AB - We examine the extent to which parents use housing and shared living arrangements as a form of risk-sharing for their adult children, using detailed data on children and parents in the Health and Retirement Study for 1998-2012. On average, a young man moving from full-time to nonemployment raises the likelihood of coresiding with a parent by 1.5 percentage points; moving from full-time employment to being part-time employed raises the likelihood of coresiding with a parent by 2 percentage points. The implied elasticity of parental coresidence with respect to the son's income is -1.1; for daughters, the elasticity is -0.5.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84959451675&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84959451675&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/1540-6229.12152

DO - 10.1111/1540-6229.12152

M3 - Article

JO - Real Estate Economics

JF - Real Estate Economics

SN - 1080-8620

ER -