The Geopolitics of Renewables in Kazakhstan and Russia

Natalie Koch, Veli Pekka Tynkkynen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article examines recent renewable energy initiatives in two hydrocarbon rich states of Eurasia: Kazakhstan and Russia. The global nature of challenges surrounding energy and natural resource use demand that sustainability and “energy transition” policies be understood as geopolitical issues, which are increasingly (re)defining political relations among and within states. Existing research and media coverage of international energy politics in Eurasia is overwhelmingly dominated by a focus on oil and gas extraction, especially in Kazakhstan and Russia, due to their central place in traditional hydrocarbon fuels markets. As elsewhere in the world, however, political and economic leaders in both countries have started to adopt the language of promoting environmental sustainability, the “green economy,” and renewable energy infrastructures. Taking a critical geopolitics lens to recent developments, this article considers who is involved in advancing renewable energy in contexts that have traditionally been dependent on traditional energy sources, and what this may portend for the shifting energy landscape of Eurasia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalGeopolitics
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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geopolitics
Kazakhstan
renewable energy
Russia
energy
sustainability
political relations
energy source
hydrocarbon
natural resources
coverage
leader
infrastructure
energy resource
resource use
economy
politics
demand
market
natural resource

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Political Science and International Relations

Cite this

The Geopolitics of Renewables in Kazakhstan and Russia. / Koch, Natalie; Tynkkynen, Veli Pekka.

In: Geopolitics, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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