The geography of change in the newspaper industry of the northeast United States, 1940-1980.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

In 1980 the Northeast had one-quarter fewer daily newspapers than in 1940. Analysis of change in the region's newspaper industry reveals three principal trends. Foreign-language daily newspapers declined as the immigrant groups served were assimilated into the general population. For English language daily newspapers, far fewer cities had competing dailies in 1980, and where both morning and afternoon papers were present, they often were published by the same owner. These trends reflect the emergence of the electronic news media, increased automobile ownership, and population shifts to areas outside the region's metropolitan central cities.-from Author

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings - Pennsylvania Academy of Science
Pages55-59
Number of pages5
Volume60
StatePublished - 1986

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industry
ownership
automobile
geography
city
trend
analysis
electronics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Monmonier, M. (1986). The geography of change in the newspaper industry of the northeast United States, 1940-1980. In Proceedings - Pennsylvania Academy of Science (Vol. 60, pp. 55-59)

The geography of change in the newspaper industry of the northeast United States, 1940-1980. / Monmonier, Mark.

Proceedings - Pennsylvania Academy of Science. Vol. 60 1986. p. 55-59.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Monmonier, M 1986, The geography of change in the newspaper industry of the northeast United States, 1940-1980. in Proceedings - Pennsylvania Academy of Science. vol. 60, pp. 55-59.
Monmonier M. The geography of change in the newspaper industry of the northeast United States, 1940-1980. In Proceedings - Pennsylvania Academy of Science. Vol. 60. 1986. p. 55-59
Monmonier, Mark. / The geography of change in the newspaper industry of the northeast United States, 1940-1980. Proceedings - Pennsylvania Academy of Science. Vol. 60 1986. pp. 55-59
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