The gender paradigm in domestic violence research and practice part II: The information website of the American Bar Association

Donald G. Dutton, Kenneth N. Corvo, John Hamel

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Website of the American Bar Association (ABA) sets out to correct ten purported myths about domestic or intimate partner violence (IPV). The critique of these myths appears to be empirically based. However, a close reading of the studies used to debunk these "myths" shows that they are either: 1) government publications with no empirical data, or 2) empirical studies that do not refute the targeted myth. The problems with the false conclusions on the website are varied, but three main ones are: 1) confusion of allegations of abuse with real incidence of abuse; 2) interpretations of unsubstantiated claims of child abuse that are based on varied sources for corroboration that use vague decision criteria in studies not designed to assess malingered claims; and 3) over simplification of the complex causality of psychological phenomena, such as Parental Alienation Syndrome. In many of these studies, social science methodology may be poorly suited to answer questions best left to an unbiased weighting of facts in an individual case.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)30-38
Number of pages9
JournalAggression and Violent Behavior
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2009

Keywords

  • Child abuse
  • Gender paradigm
  • Legal policy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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