The effects of three different computer texts on readers' recall: Based on working memory capacity

Moon J. Lee, Matthew C. Tedder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

56 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of three different computer texts on readers' recall based on individuals' different working memory capacities. In addition, the intermediate effects of the total reading time were taken into account. The findings indicated that the structure and presentation of text influence how well information is remembered. Those who read the linear, traditional text produced better recall scores than those who read the hypertexts. In particular, when the total time spent on reading was controlled, the difference between the two hypertexts disappeared. Furthermore, the participants with different working memory capacities appeared to exhibit different results in that those who were low in working memory produced the best results with the traditional text while the difference was not significant among the different conditions for those who were high in working memory.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)767-783
Number of pages17
JournalComputers in Human Behavior
Volume19
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2003
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Disorientation
  • Hypermedia
  • Hypertext
  • Hypertext design
  • New media
  • Recognition
  • Tailored communication
  • Working memory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Psychology(all)

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