The effects of the clock and kickoff rule changes on actual and market-based expected scoring in NCAA football

Kenneth Linna, Evan Moore, Rodney Paul, Andrew Weinbach

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Clock rule changes were introduced in the 2006 season with the goal of reducing the average duration of the game; these changes were reversed in 2007. In addition, in 2007 the kickoff rule was changed to create more excitement and potentially more scoring. We examine what happened to actual and expected scoring during these National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) football seasons. The clock rule change in 2006 led to lower scoring which was not fully encompassed in the betting market, leading to significant returns to betting the under. Multiple rule changes in 2007 led to volatility in the betting market that subsided by season’s end.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)179-192
Number of pages14
JournalInternational Journal of Financial Studies
Volume2
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2014

Keywords

  • Amateur sports
  • Betting
  • Gambling
  • Market efficiency
  • Prediction markets
  • Rule change
  • Scoring

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Finance

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