The effects of marital and parental status on informal support and service utilization: A study of older Swedes living alone

Kristina Larsson, Merril Silverstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Scopus citations

Abstract

Never-married individuals and childless persons living alone are at greater risk of having insufficient support in old age. This study investigated whether community-dwelling older people, living alone in an urban area of Sweden, benefit from having been previously married and having had children in terms of informal care received, and whether those without such filial support were compensated by formal services. The study sample consisted of 390 persons, 81 years and older, who were interviewed about family support and the use of public eldercare and market-based services. The study showed that parents had considerably higher odds of receiving informal support, whereas previously married individuals without children were no more likely to receive support than their never-married counterparts. Public home-help services did not fully buffer the lack of care among childless individuals. This indicates that even in an advanced welfare state like Sweden, children are assets for receipt of care in old age.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)231-244
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Aging Studies
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2004
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Informal support
  • Marital and parental status
  • Service utilization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Issues, ethics and legal aspects
  • Health Policy

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The effects of marital and parental status on informal support and service utilization: A study of older Swedes living alone'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this