The effects of assessment mode and privacy level on self-reports of risky sexual behaviors and substance use among young women

Jennifer L. Brown, Peter A. Vanable

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined differences in reported behaviors by assessment mode under differing privacy levels. Females were randomized to a computer-administered self-interview (CASI) or self-administered questionnaire (SAQ) assessment of sexual risk and substance use behaviors that was completed non-anonymously or anonymously. There were few differences in reported behaviors between assessment modes and privacy levels. However, an assessment mode by privacy-level interaction was found for 2 outcomes (unprotected oral sex, recent sexual partner). Greater disclosure occurred in the CASI-anonymous condition than the CASI-non-anonymous condition. Those in the CASI condition disclosed more instances of drinking until intoxicated than did those completing the SAQ. Overall, the findings suggest that CASI and SAQ under differing privacy levels result in comparable health behavior self-reports.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2756-2778
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Applied Social Psychology
Volume39
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2009

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

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