The development of a computer-administered cognitive-behavioral intervention to promote stress management among HIV+ women

Jennifer L. Brown, Peter A. Vanable, Michael P. Carey, Larry Elin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Few interventions address the unique psychosocial needs of HIV+ women. To address this unmet need, we developed and pilot tested a brief, cognitive-behavioral computerized stress management intervention with 60 HIV+ women. This interactive intervention included modules that promoted cognitive appraisal skills, encouraged appropriate coping responses and problem solving skills, and provided relaxation training. In this report we provide an overview of the intervention and present acceptability and feasibility data from a pilot intervention trial. All participants successfully navigated the computerized program and most found the intervention to be acceptable. Overall, the results indicated that a brief, computerized stress management intervention was a feasible and acceptable approach to enhance stress management skills; use of this intervention has the potential to reduce distress and improve health outcomes among HIV+ women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)265-280
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Cognitive Psychotherapy
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

Keywords

  • Cognitive-behavioral
  • Coping
  • HIV
  • Stress
  • Stress management
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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