The consequences of differentiation in episodic memory: Similarity and the strength based mirror effect

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

65 Scopus citations

Abstract

When items on one list receive more encoding than items on another list, the improvement in performance usually manifests as an increase in the hit rate and a decrease in the false alarm rate (FAR). A common account of this strength based mirror effect is that participants adopt a more strict criterion following a strongly than weakly encoded list (e.g., Cary & Reder, 2003; Stretch & Wixted, 1998). Differentiation models offer an alternative: more encoding leads to a more accurate memory representation for the studied item. A more accurate representation is less confusable with an unrelated item, resulting in a decrease in the FAR (McClelland & Chappell, 1998; Shiffrin & Steyvers, 1997). Differentiation models make additional predictions about reversals in FARs for foils similar to a studied item as a function of the composition of the study list. These predictions were empirically tested and confirmed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)461-478
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Memory and Language
Volume55
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2006
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Criterion shifts
  • Differentiation
  • False memory
  • Memory models
  • Mirror effect
  • Recognition memory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Artificial Intelligence

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