The Changing Demography of Late-Life Family Caregiving: A Research Agenda to Understand Future Care Networks for an Aging U.S. Population

Vicki A. Freedman, Emily M. Agree, Judith A. Seltzer, Kira S. Birditt, Karen L. Fingerman, Esther M. Friedman, I. Fen Lin, Rachel Margolis, Sung S. Park, Sarah E. Patterson, Courtney A. Polenick, Rin Reczek, Adriana M. Reyes, Yulya Truskinovsky, Emily E. Wiemers, Huijing Wu, Douglas Alan Wolf, Jennifer L. Wolff, Steven H. Zarit

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Repeated claims that a dwindling supply of potential caregivers is creating a crisis in care for the U.S. aging population have not been wellgrounded in empirical research. Concerns about the supply of family care do not adequately recognize factors that may modify the availability and willingness of family and friends to provide care to older persons in need of assistance or the increasing heterogeneity of the older population. In this paper, we set forth a framework that places family caregiving in the context of older adults' care needs, the alternatives available to them, and the outcomes of that care. We focus on care networks, rather than individuals, and discuss the demographic and social changes that may alter the formation of care networks in the future. Last, we identify research areas to prioritize in order to better support planning efforts to care for the aging U.S. population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbergnad036
JournalGerontologist
Volume64
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2024

Keywords

  • Caregiving
  • Demography
  • Family issues
  • Well-being

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Medicine

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