The association between financial resources strain and self-reported antiretroviral therapy (Art) adherence among hiv-positive men who have sex with men

Ervin M. Simmons, Madison K. Firkey, Alan Z. Sheinfil, Jeremy M. Ramos, Sarah E. Woolf-King

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between financial resources strain and self-reported ART adherence among men who have sex with men (MSM) who are living with HIV. Secondary data analyses were conducted with a sample of HIV-positive MSM (N = 77) who participated in a daily diary study on substance use and sexual behavior. Logistic regression was used to model the odds of self-reported ART adherence associated with financial resources strain. The adjusted model revealed a significant association between financial resources strain and self-reported ART adherence such that financially strained participants were 78.4% less likely to have “excellent” self-reported adherence abil-ity compared with non-financially strained participants (aOR = .216, 95% CI [.063, .749], p = .016). Financial resources strain may negatively influence ART adherence. Future research should consider objectively measuring ART adherence. Health care providers might consider assessing patients’ financial situation to identify those at-risk for nonadherence.

Keywords

  • Financial resources strain
  • HIV
  • Medication adherence
  • MSM

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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