The American Journalist in the Digital Age: How journalists and the public think about journalism in the United States

Lars Willnat, David H. Weaver, G. Cleveland Wilhoit

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper reports findings from a 2013 survey of 1080 US journalists and a 2014 survey of 1230 US citizens, focusing on their views of traditional journalism roles and the performance of journalism in the United States. The study finds significant differences in how journalists and the public evaluate news media performance and journalistic roles. It also finds that news consumption and social media use predict stronger support for traditional journalistic roles among journalists and citizens.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-19
Number of pages19
JournalJournalism Studies
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Oct 27 2017

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journalism
journalist
news
US citizen
social media
performance
citizen

Keywords

  • journalistic roles
  • public perceptions
  • survey
  • US journalists

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication

Cite this

The American Journalist in the Digital Age : How journalists and the public think about journalism in the United States. / Willnat, Lars; Weaver, David H.; Wilhoit, G. Cleveland.

In: Journalism Studies, 27.10.2017, p. 1-19.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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