That i’ll be killed: Pre-service and in-service teachers’ greatest fears and beliefs about school violence

Kimberly Williams, Ken Corvo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Pre-service teachers who had completed their practicum or student teaching and in-service teachers in their first 3 years of teaching (n = 218) completed open-ended surveys about their beliefs and fears of school violence and rated their fears for such acts as use of weapons and the likelihood of those acts about their fears about schools and school violence. There were significant differences between pre-service and in-service teachers in their rankings of fearful events and the perceived likelihood of these events using t-tests to compare the groups. The informants reported being most afraid of guns or other weapons or other forms of dangerous violence (hostage taking, an outside stranger coming in and threatening their students, and so on). These fears were significantly correlated with their beliefs in the likelihood that these events would happen. Open-ended questions revealed that pre-service teachers tended to be more afraid for their personal safety and personal failure in a crisis situation and in-service classroom teachers tended to be more afraid for their students’ safety. The implications for teacher education and preparing teachers to address school violence are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)47-69
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of School Violence
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005

Keywords

  • Safety
  • School violence
  • Surveys
  • Teacher fears
  • Weapons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality

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