Testing the cognitive-affective consistency model of intercultural attitudes: Do stereotypical perceptions influence prejudicial feelings?

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7 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper explores how cognitive beliefs, emotional feelings, and attitudinal evaluations toward racial/ethnic out-groups are inter-related. The first two studies examined the content and strength of contemporary cultural stereotypes associated by White-American participants with African-Americans and Asian-Indians. Path analyses using empirical data from the final survey (N = 227) reveal a complex set of relationships among stereotypical beliefs, prejudicial feelings, and overall favorability toward African-Americans and Asian-Indians. Interestingly, even seemingly positive stereotypes can activate negative emotions toward out-groups. Additionally, hostile and benevolent prejudicial feelings lead to decreased favorability toward out-groups. Results find support for mixed emotion models such as the stereotype content model rather than the traditional tripartite model of attitudinal consistency.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)105-121
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Intercultural Communication Research
Volume39
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Intercultural Communication
  • Prejudice
  • Racial Attitudes
  • Stereotypes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Communication

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