System and Method for Delivery of DNA-Binding Chemotherapy Drugs Using Gold Nanoparticles

Colleen Alexander (Inventor), James C. Dabrowiak (Inventor), Mathew Maye (Inventor)

Research output: Patent

Abstract

System and method for loading the front line anticancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX) onto DNA-capped gold nanoparticles whose duplex DNA has been designed for specific DOX intercalation. Since each AuNP contains about 108 high affinity drug sites, this design allows for a high local DOX concentration on the particle. Drug binding was confirmed by monitoring the increase in DNA melting temperature, the shift in the plasmon resonance maximum, and the increase in the NP hydrodynamic radius as a function of [DOX]/[DNA] ratio. The feasibility of the nanoparticles as a drug delivery system was demonstrated by showing that particle-bound DOX could be transferred to a target DNA.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Patent number8,632,789
StatePublished - Jun 7 2012

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Chemotherapy
Gold
Doxorubicin
Nanoparticles
DNA
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Intercalation
Melting point
Hydrodynamics
Monitoring
doxorubicin-DNA

Cite this

System and Method for Delivery of DNA-Binding Chemotherapy Drugs Using Gold Nanoparticles. / Alexander, Colleen (Inventor); Dabrowiak, James C. (Inventor); Maye, Mathew (Inventor).

Patent No.: 8,632,789.

Research output: Patent

Alexander, Colleen (Inventor) ; Dabrowiak, James C. (Inventor) ; Maye, Mathew (Inventor). / System and Method for Delivery of DNA-Binding Chemotherapy Drugs Using Gold Nanoparticles. Patent No.: 8,632,789.
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abstract = "System and method for loading the front line anticancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX) onto DNA-capped gold nanoparticles whose duplex DNA has been designed for specific DOX intercalation. Since each AuNP contains about 108 high affinity drug sites, this design allows for a high local DOX concentration on the particle. Drug binding was confirmed by monitoring the increase in DNA melting temperature, the shift in the plasmon resonance maximum, and the increase in the NP hydrodynamic radius as a function of [DOX]/[DNA] ratio. The feasibility of the nanoparticles as a drug delivery system was demonstrated by showing that particle-bound DOX could be transferred to a target DNA.",
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AB - System and method for loading the front line anticancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX) onto DNA-capped gold nanoparticles whose duplex DNA has been designed for specific DOX intercalation. Since each AuNP contains about 108 high affinity drug sites, this design allows for a high local DOX concentration on the particle. Drug binding was confirmed by monitoring the increase in DNA melting temperature, the shift in the plasmon resonance maximum, and the increase in the NP hydrodynamic radius as a function of [DOX]/[DNA] ratio. The feasibility of the nanoparticles as a drug delivery system was demonstrated by showing that particle-bound DOX could be transferred to a target DNA.

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