Synthetic Pheromones for Avoiding Social Dilemmas

Matthew H. Thomas, Jae C. Oh

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Braess' Paradox is a social dilemma that occurs when adding more of a limited resource to a system decreases the performance of the system rather than increases it as expected. To avoid this paradox, we propose a biologically inspired system of agents that use ant-like pheromones. Using only locally available information in the form of synthetic pheromones, the agents in our system avoid Braess' paradox and perform well compared with agents that don't use pheromones, especially when they weigh the pheromone information more heavily than the path cost to make routing decisions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 6th Joint Conference on Information Sciences, JCIS 2002
EditorsJ.H. Caulfield, S.H. Chen, H.D. Cheng, R. Duro, J.H. Caufield, S.H. Chen, H.D. Cheng, R. Duro, V. Honavar
Pages655-658
Number of pages4
StatePublished - Dec 1 2002
EventProceedings of the 6th Joint Conference on Information Sciences, JCIS 2002 - Research Triange Park, NC, United States
Duration: Mar 8 2002Mar 13 2002

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Joint Conference on Information Sciences
Volume6

Other

OtherProceedings of the 6th Joint Conference on Information Sciences, JCIS 2002
CountryUnited States
CityResearch Triange Park, NC
Period3/8/023/13/02

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)

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  • Cite this

    Thomas, M. H., & Oh, J. C. (2002). Synthetic Pheromones for Avoiding Social Dilemmas. In J. H. Caulfield, S. H. Chen, H. D. Cheng, R. Duro, J. H. Caufield, S. H. Chen, H. D. Cheng, R. Duro, & V. Honavar (Eds.), Proceedings of the 6th Joint Conference on Information Sciences, JCIS 2002 (pp. 655-658). (Proceedings of the Joint Conference on Information Sciences; Vol. 6).