Surface reactions on the human body: Using personal ventilation to remove Squalene oxidation products from the breathing zone with CFD

Jackie Russo, H. Ezzat Khalifa

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Chemical reactions can have a significant effect on indoor concentration levels by decreasing or increasing pollutant levels and producing products that would not normally be present. For this work, a computational fluid dyanamics (CFD) model that has been validated for flow field predictions will be improved to predict the concentrations of Ozone, Squalene and oxidation products. The use of surface reactions were validated with experimental data by Rim et al. (2009) who studied the Ozone/human body reaction on a cylinder in a stainless steel chamber and agreement was achieved to within the experimental error. After validation, a hypothetical reaction was studied in a typical office setup with optional personal ventilation (PV) systems. The results show that, the concentration distribution is not well mixed. For circumstances where indoor sources or chemical reactions are present in the indoor environment, assuming well mixed distributions can lead to significant over or under prediction of inhalation exposure. The results also show that PV can reduce inhalation exposure to reaction products by a factor of four.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication12th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate 2011
Pages1719-1724
Number of pages6
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011
Event12th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate 2011 - Austin, TX, United States
Duration: Jun 5 2011Jun 10 2011

Publication series

Name12th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate 2011
Volume3

Other

Other12th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate 2011
CountryUnited States
CityAustin, TX
Period6/5/116/10/11

Keywords

  • Chemical reactions
  • Ozone
  • Personal ventilation
  • Squalene

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pollution

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  • Cite this

    Russo, J., & Khalifa, H. E. (2011). Surface reactions on the human body: Using personal ventilation to remove Squalene oxidation products from the breathing zone with CFD. In 12th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate 2011 (pp. 1719-1724). (12th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate 2011; Vol. 3).