Sulfur isotope evidence for regional recharge of saline water during continental glaciation, north-central United States

D. I. Siegel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Sulfate concentration in groundwater from the Cambrian-Ordovician aquifer of southeastern Wisconsin and northern Illinois increase up to hundreds of times where the aquifer is confined beneath the Maquoketa Shale. There is no sulfate source in the aquifer or overyling rocks except for minor amounts of finely disseminated pyrite. Coinciding with increasing sulfate concentrations, δ 34 S of the dissolved sulfate increases from less than -5‰ in the unconfined part of the aquifer to a nearly constant value of 20‰ where the aquifer is confined and where sulfate reduction is minimal. The most likely source for this isotopically heavy sulfate is groundwater associated with Silurian evaporites under Lake Michigan. It is uncertain if the sulfate-rich water was emplaced in pulses or mostly during the last glaciation. -Author

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1054-1056
Number of pages3
JournalGeology
Volume18
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geology

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