States, Nations, and Territorial Stability: Why Chinese Hegemony Would Be Better for International Order

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

How would a hegemonic China shape international norms related to states, nations, and territoriality? Scholars have noted the conflict between the right of minority nations to self-determine and the right of states to maintain their territorial integrity. An unrestricted application of the former would risk considerable state fragmentation; an unconditional acceptance of the latter would condemn stateless nations to a subordinate status. Powerful actors like the United States have attempted to navigate these norms by specifying the conditions under which one norm should take precedence over the other, but such decisions are difficult to make in an international environment that lacks consensus, and the result is an ambiguous international order where conflict is common. I analyze the future of these norms in a Chinese-led international order, explaining why China would champion territorial integrity over self-determination, and why this would be better for territorial stability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)519-545
Number of pages27
JournalSecurity Studies
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2 2016
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Political Science and International Relations
  • Sociology and Political Science

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'States, Nations, and Territorial Stability: Why Chinese Hegemony Would Be Better for International Order'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this