State-dependent Gaussian interference channels: Can state be fully canceled?

Ruchen Duan, Yingbin Liang, Shlomo Shamai Shitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

The state-dependent Gaussian interference channel (IC) and Z-IC are investigated, in which two receivers are corrupted by the same but differently scaled states. The state sequence is noncausally known at both transmitters, but not known at either receiver. Three interference regimes are studied, i.e., the very strong, strong, and weak regimes. In the very strong regime, the capacity region is characterized under certain channel parameters by designing a cooperative dirty paper coding between the two transmitters to fully cancel the state. In the strong regime, points on the capacity region boundary are characterized under certain channel parameters by designing an achievable scheme based on rate splitting, layered dirty paper coding, and successive state cancellation. In the weak regime, the sum capacity is obtained by independent dirty paper coding at two transmitters. For all the above regimes, the capacity achieves that of the IC/Z-IC without state. Comparison between the state-dependent regular IC and the Z-IC suggests that even with one interference-free link, the Z-IC does not necessarily perform better, because dirty paper coded interference in the regular IC facilitates to cancel the state through the cooperative dirty paper coding between the transmitters.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number7407395
Pages (from-to)1957-1970
Number of pages14
JournalIEEE Transactions on Information Theory
Volume62
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016

Keywords

  • Capacity region
  • channel state
  • dirty paper coding
  • Gel-fand-Pinsker scheme
  • interference channel
  • noncausal state information
  • Z-interference channel

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Information Systems
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Library and Information Sciences

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'State-dependent Gaussian interference channels: Can state be fully canceled?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this